Discover BDD with Gaspar Nagy and Seb Rose

Gaspar Nagy – who has been involved with SpecFlow since its inception – and Seb Rose – a core member of the open source Cucumber project – have teamed up to publish Discovery – Explore behaviour using examples. This is the first book in a series on BDD. Gaspar had the following to say about the motivation behind writing the book, and the type of content you can expect.

 

When it comes to BDD, there are generally 3 types of people:

  1. Those who do not know what BDD stands for at all (how sad!)
  2. Those who know BDD, and claim to implement it with their team, but where it turns out that their focus is only on the tools
  3. Those for whom BDD is a holistic approach

The initial idea was for a SpecFlow book that would essentially be a port of the “Cucumber for Java” book: a collection of technical tips etc. In other words, yet another technical book. While working on the core, it quickly became apparent that a SpecFlow book would never be complete without mentioning the collaborative aspects of BDD. So we ended up diving deeper into the BDD realm. At some point we made a decision: let this book be about BDD, instead of SpecFlow. In fact, let there be a BDD book series!

Why? Because in our opinion the BDD process can be divided into 3 stages:

  1. Discovery: explore and discover details through examples
  2. Formulation: convert examples to scenarios
  3. Automation: write test automation code

My painful experience is that the earlier a team adopts BDD, the better results they get. So why not give teams a helping hand (or even a compass) right at the start, in the discovery phase? We decided that this would be the essence of the first book in the series.

It took several months of intensive work with Seb to complete the 5 chapters of Discovery. At about 100 pages, it is relatively short, and said to be an easy read, so you could read it on a plane. The book is written for everyone: developers and testers, as well as product owners and test managers. Discovery – Explore behaviour using examples is also tool-agnostic: the emphasis is not on the technical process but on the collaborative aspect. The book covers the following:

Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the nature of BDD, where the important elements are explained.

Chapter 2 is an important chapter about structured conversation, providing hints on how testers and business stakeholders can be better involved in meetings, and how a shared understanding of the requirements can be achieved. A number of techniques, in particular Example Mapping (introduced by Matt Wynne), are described here through imaginative use cases.

Chapter 3 is about examples, and how there are more than just Given/When/Then test cases.

Chapter 4 covers tips on how a BDD approach can fit your project, regardless of whether you use Scrum, Kanban or any other framework.

Chapter 5 is all about how to sell BDD to business stakeholders, and make them interested in BDD. It includes tips on how to demonstrate that BDD is more than a mere technique applicable only to the tasks of developers and testers. Illustrative examples ensure that business stakeholders can relate to the advantages and share a common understanding as to why BDD is good for the entire team, saving time and effort on bug hunting. In order to reap the biggest benefits of BDD, the business side should be involved in the entire process from the start to finish.

Get your copy and let the discovery begin! You can find it on Amazon/Leanpub through http://bddbooks.com!